Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

Invasive ductal carcinoma is a common form of breast cancer, accounting for approximately 80 percent of all breast cancer diagnoses. This malignancy develops in the ducts that carry milk from the milk glands to the nipples. From there, it can spread into the nearby tissues and lymph nodes. The extent of the cancer is what separates invasive, or infiltrating, ductal carcinoma from another similar type of breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ. Invasive means that the cancer has invaded nearby breast tissue, while in situ means that the cancer has not spread outside of the duct(s).

Because invasive ductal carcinomas have spread outside of their original location, they often require a combination of several treatments. Depending on the extent of the metastasis, surgery may be recommended to remove part or all of the breast; surgical removal of the lymph nodes may also be necessary. After surgical treatment, one or more of the following treatments may be recommended to destroy cancerous cells that have spread beyond the original tumor: 

  • Chemotherapy
  • Radiation therapy
  • Targeted therapy
  • Hormone therapy, if the cancerous cells are receptive to hormone-based treatments

Patients with invasive ductal carcinoma can receive comprehensive care at Tampa General Hospital. Offering a wide range of advanced treatments, preventive options, and compassionate supportive care options available in a single location, we are a leading destination for both male and female breast cancer patients. We design each patient’s treatment plan to account for a number of individualized factors, as well as a patient’s personal preferences. A multidisciplinary team of oncologists designs and carries out each unique treatment plan.

At TGH, we treat invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ, and all other types of benign and malignant breast tumors. For a physician referral or to make an appointment, please call (813) 844-2200.